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Flood Safety

FLOOD SAFETY

 Flood Safety Tips_thumb.jpg  Your personal safety is of the upmost importance. Whether you stay in your home or choose to evacuate, be sure to have an ample supply of water, non-perishable foods, and medicines to last a week. Have plenty of spare lanterns, flashlights, and batteries on hand. Keep the gas tank on your vehicles full.
 Utilities - Gas. If your utilities are powered with gas, do not use until the gas company says it is safe to do so. Be alert for gas leaks. Use a flashlight to inspect for damage. Don’t smoke or use candles, lanterns, or open flames unless you are sure the gas has been turned off and the area has been aired out. Utilities – Electric. If the water level rose high enough to soak your electrical appliances, turn off your electricity until they can dry out thoroughly. Some appliances, such as television sets, can retain an electrical charge and shock you even after they have been turned off. Don’t use appliances or motors that have gotten wet unless they have been taken apart, cleaned, and dried.

Carbon Monoxide Warning. CO exhaust kills. Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machine outdoors. The same goes for camping stoves. Fumes from charcoal are especially deadly; if you must cook with charcoal, use it only outdoors.

If you must leave the safety of your home, don’t go near downed power poles or electrical wires.
 When driving, be aware that the road bed under flood waters may be damaged. NEVER drive around a barricade to cross a flooded street. It takes only two feet of water to carry away a vehicle, including pickups and SUVs. If your vehicle stalls, get out immediately and go to higher ground.  When driving, be aware that the road bed under flood waters may be damaged. NEVER drive around a barricade to cross a flooded street. It takes only two feet of water to carry away a vehicle, including pickups and SUVs. If your vehicle stalls, get out immediately and go to higher ground.
 

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 Walking.jpg  Walking through flood waters can be equally dangerous. A mere six inches of flowing water can knock an adult off his feet. If you must walk through flood waters, use a long stick or pole to tap in front of you to ensure the ground is still there. Walking through flood waters can be equally dangerous. A mere six inches of flowing water can knock an adult off his feet. If you must walk through flood waters, use a long stick or pole to tap in front of you to ensure the ground is still there. Walking through flood waters can be equally dangerous. A mere six inches of flowing water can knock an adult off his feet. If you must walk through flood waters, use a long stick or pole to tap in front of you to ensure the ground is still there.
 Look Before You Step. Be careful not to step on electrical wires, broken bottles or nails. Stairs can be slippery with mud. Be alert for small animals, especially snakes. Animals that have been flooded from their homes may seek shelter in yours.